Act like Republicans

Investors Business Daily:

For the GOP, hand-wringing and self-reflection seem to be the order of the day following the resignation of House Speaker Paul Ryan. Many see this as yet another ill omen of a midterm-election shellacking by the Democrats. Maybe, but it doesn’t have to be that way.

Give Ryan his due: He pushed through the giant GOP tax-cut bill and, along with Trump, deserves a great deal of credit for the improved tone of the U.S. economy, in particular its robust jobs growth. And, in a city increasingly marked by bitterly divisive and mean-spirited partisanship, Ryan stood out as a genuinely nice person.

That could be seen in his classy exit speech, which focused on accomplishments, not finger-pointing.

“We’ve gotten tax reform done for the first time in a generation. We’ve rebuilt the military from being hollowed out, which was really important,” he said. “We deregulated the economy, which is really helping the economy grow.”

For the GOP, hand-wringing and self-reflection seem to be the order of the day following the resignation of House Speaker Paul Ryan. Many see this as yet another ill omen of a midterm-election shellacking by the Democrats. Maybe, but it doesn’t have to be that way.

Give Ryan his due: He pushed through the giant GOP tax-cut bill and, along with Trump, deserves a great deal of credit for the improved tone of the U.S. economy, in particular its robust jobs growth. And, in a city increasingly marked by bitterly divisive and mean-spirited partisanship, Ryan stood out as a genuinely nice person.

That could be seen in his classy exit speech, which focused on accomplishments, not finger-pointing.


“We’ve gotten tax reform done for the first time in a generation. We’ve rebuilt the military from being hollowed out, which was really important,” he said. “We deregulated the economy, which is really helping the economy grow.”

When Ryan gives as reasons for quitting that he wants to watch his kids grow up and is tired of Washington, we don’t doubt it. He didn’t ask to be House speaker. His party chose him.

Moreover, virtually alone in Washington, he has pushed and pushed to have spending and entitlement reforms that would put the U.S. budget back onto fiscally sound footing, rather than sliding into fiscal hell, as we are now. At least he tried.

Unfortunately, now many in the GOP see Ryan’s departure as a sure sign they can’t win in November. Given recent special elections, which have been dominated by Democrat winners, there’s reason to think they’re right.

Even so, that’s no reason to give up on basic principles. Indeed, if anything, Republicans have every reason to double-down on their core beliefs of smaller, more responsive government, low taxes, rule of law, and personal responsibility over collective responsibility.

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EDITORIALS
After Ryan’s Departure, GOP Can Avoid Dreaded ‘Blue Wave’ Only By Fighting For Bedrock Principles

4/12/2018
For the GOP, hand-wringing and self-reflection seem to be the order of the day following the resignation of House Speaker Paul Ryan. Many see this as yet another ill omen of a midterm-election shellacking by the Democrats. Maybe, but it doesn’t have to be that way.

Give Ryan his due: He pushed through the giant GOP tax-cut bill and, along with Trump, deserves a great deal of credit for the improved tone of the U.S. economy, in particular its robust jobs growth. And, in a city increasingly marked by bitterly divisive and mean-spirited partisanship, Ryan stood out as a genuinely nice person.

That could be seen in his classy exit speech, which focused on accomplishments, not finger-pointing.

“We’ve gotten tax reform done for the first time in a generation. We’ve rebuilt the military from being hollowed out, which was really important,” he said. “We deregulated the economy, which is really helping the economy grow.

When Ryan gives as reasons for quitting that he wants to watch his kids grow up and is tired of Washington, we don’t doubt it. He didn’t ask to be House speaker. His party chose him.

Moreover, virtually alone in Washington, he has pushed and pushed to have spending and entitlement reforms that would put the U.S. budget back onto fiscally sound footing, rather than sliding into fiscal hell, as we are now. At least he tried.


Unfortunately, now many in the GOP see Ryan’s departure as a sure sign they can’t win in November. Given recent special elections, which have been dominated by Democrat winners, there’s reason to think they’re right.

Even so, that’s no reason to give up on basic principles. Indeed, if anything, Republicans have every reason to double-down on their core beliefs of smaller, more responsive government, low taxes, rule of law, and personal responsibility over collective responsibility.

They should assume the worst: They’ll go down in flames to the Democrats, who, along with the mainstream media, have basically run into the American theater every day for the last year and a half yelling “fire” while pushing a big-government agenda that will impoverish us all. If Americans buy the Democrats’ dire baloney amid our unusual economic prosperity and deregulation, Ryan will be handing his gavel over to a Democrat — maybe even giving it back to far-left relic Nancy Pelosi.

But, ever the optimist, Ryan doesn’t think so.

“I have every confidence that I’ll be handing this gavel on to the next Republican speaker of the House next year,” Ryan said, in announcing his retirement.

Asked how much of a role the chance of a congressional landslide by the Democrats played in his decision, his answer was direct: “None whatsoever, actually.”

But rank-and-file Republicans are worried about being hit by a Democrat blue tidal wave this fall. Already, 24 Republicans have announced they will retire from the House this year, “the most in one congressional cycle dating back to 1973, according to ‘casualty lists’ compiled by the congressional reporting outlet Roll Call,” wrote The Daily Signal.

Both House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, the No. 3 GOP leader in the House, and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy are considered logical replacements for Ryan.

But here’s the point: No matter who takes over, they face an uphill battle.

In the meantime, presuming that current polls are correct and Democrats could take back the House in November, why should the Republicans continue to wallow in defeatism?

Wouldn’t it be far better for the conservative cause they espouse and say they deeply believe in to go down fighting, pushing for major welfare and entitlement reforms, making the Trump tax cuts permanent, putting dozens of judges on the bench that actually respect the Constitution, curbing spending by big government, cutting even more regulations, building our defense, and putting an end to our open-door immigration policies?

If they showed that kind of courage, they might be surprised that a lot of voters would support them — and maybe they’d even hold the House and the Senate.

We know losing is not fun. But here’s a message to the GOP faithful in both the House and the Senate:

Our country is in the middle of a historic and bitterly divisive debate over whether it will continue to be a republic built on individual rights and limited government, or become a kind of postmodern, politically correct, progressive social democracy with limited individual rights and creeping collectivism.

It’s no exaggeration to say our very freedoms and traditions as a republic are at stake. If you truly believe what you say you do, don’t quit. Fight for what you believe in. There’s deep respect for those who fight hard but lose, and none at all for those who walk away from the fight.

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